Public Budgeting and Performance Need Urgent Improvement: Taxpayers Pay More to Get Less

Over the last five years, taxpayers funded more than $1.1 trillion in government spending, each year pumping more money into the government coffers than the previous year. Despite this, taxpayers received less and less in return. The government unable to use taxpayers’ money to improve the economy and create opportunities for families and businesses to succeed. Moreover, its budget and policies undermined growth and began to reverse decades of positive economic momentum and social and economic progress. Government officials must start making better investment decisions to ensure taxpayers get a good return for their hard-earned dollars.

Mortgaging Guyanese Future and the Economy: An In-Depth Analysis of the 2018 Budget

The government’s budget for the fiscal year 2018 essentially mortgaged the future of Guyanese and the economy. Despite record level spending, the budget cuts funding for the infrastructure and agriculture sectors that are critical for creating employment opportunities, mostly for low-skilled workers. Lawmakers continued to shift billions to shore up the government bureaucracy instead of better aligning spendings with social and economic needs. There are no major changes in policy direction to steer the economy away from its current downward trajectory.

Guyana: Taxpayers Lost Almost $1 Billion to Financial Waste and Abuse at the Ministry of Public Infrastructure Over Two Years

The Auditor General flagged almost $1 billion in Ministry of Public Infrastructure expenditures for financial mismanagement, waste, abuse, and non-compliance with the country’s fiscal management and accountability laws and standards during Fiscal Years 2015 and 2016. Almost $683 million represented “financial waste” and almost $243 million was “abuse,” and other forms of mismanagement. The Auditor General’s reports also identified serious concerns with widespread inefficiency and poor management of the Ministry. Lawmakers must amend or enact legislation, to end such waste, abuse, and mismanagement of public resources. These resources must deliver maximum public benefits to citizens and promote economic growth. 

Guyana has one of the Highest Mother and Child Death Rates in Latin America and the Caribbean, Mostly from Preventable Causes

Guyana continues to experience one of the highest mother and child death rates in Latin American and the Caribbean, despite economic growth and larger government spending. Insufficient public investment in the healthcare sector and the resulting poor quality of services and lack of access to needed care leads to many preventable deaths. Fortunately, there are common sense policies the government can adopt to significantly improve access to and the quality of services needed to keep mothers and children alive.

Government’s Budget for 2017 Focuses on the Wrong Priorities and is Unlikely to Spur Economic Growth

Despite the increase in expenditures, the budget makes it more difficult for low-income families to overcome poverty and achieve economic independence. Changes in the country’s tax laws shift more of the tax burden to households and disproportionately burden low-income families. Current expenditures alone consume all general revenues, limiting the sources of funding for major investment to grants and new debts. These findings raise key questions as to whether current allocations represent the best use of public funds and the implications of the current allocations and spending levels on future budget decisions.

Fiscal Health: Government’s Budget for 2017 Puts Additional Burden on Households and Future Budgets on an Uncertain Path

Despite the increase in expenditures, the budget makes it more difficult for low-income families to overcome poverty and achieve economic independence. Changes in the country’s tax laws shift more of the tax burden to households and disproportionately burden low-income families. Current expenditures alone consume all general revenues, limiting the sources of funding for major investment to grants and new debts. These findings raise key questions as to whether current allocations represent the best use of public funds and the implications of the current allocations and spending levels on future budget decisions.